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Fastest Internet Connection for Rural and Regional Australians

Technology and Wireless Satellite Internet

As technology advanced forward, many of the things we’ve taken for granted for years are being reborn under the banner of wireless or wireless satellite Internet. Of course, we’re talking about a lot more than just receiving the Internet from a satellite connection. Many other technologies have also obtained new life through the use of “sky birds.”

Some of the most visible changes in technologies has been in communications and entertainment. Cellular telephones use satellite services to bounce signals literally around the world. Although cell phone service is typically within a 2 mile radius of a cellular tower, by using the power of stationary satellites, a signal or connection on a cell phone can be routed to wherever another cell tower can be found. This is especially good news for those people who tend to be in more remote areas.

Wireless satellite Internet is a connection to the web that’s available anywhere the sky can be seen. Using a satellite to make the connection into the web holds the promise of all the web all the time, anytime. The always on no matter where you are can be a major benefit for many people. This feature is especially promising for serious followers of sports, sport teams, news, weather junkies, stock reports, etc. Imagine anytime, all the time, whenever there’s a computer to be able to log into you Internet connection using wireless satellite Internet services.

Another technology that falls under the umbrella of wireless satellite Internet is the whole television genre. Companies like Direct Way and Dish Network are rapidly building infrastructure that replaces traditional antennae or cable television reception options. For about the same price as cable-TV a clear view of the southern sky will deliver crystal clear television with all popular channels.

Movies on Demand is an up and coming technology that will literally allow you to order movies to watch whenever you want. No more being tied to the start times of the networks, cable companies or even the satellite entertainment providers. All movies, whenever, all the time is the driving force behind the wave of growth in this fast paced industry.

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Options In Broadband Internet Access

The Internet is an astonishing entity, allowing us to be connected to every corner of the world in order to communicate, seek out information, do business, and even have fun. Years ago, our connections to the Internet were limited to dial-up access, which hogged our home telephone lines and uploaded and downloaded information at a snail’s pace. Today, though, we have the fortune of being able to connect at what seems like breakneck speed in comparison with our old 28.8 Kbps modem, with the arrival of broadband Internet access.

Basically, broadband Internet access provides the user with a high data-transmission rate Internet connection. Any connection of 256 Kbps (kilobits per second) is considered broadband Internet. Because of the high rate of data transference, it is also commonly known as high-speed Internet. This is ideal for uploading large files including pictures and music, as well as downloading larger files in a fraction of the time it used to take with dial-up.
The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) identifies broadband Internet access as 200 kbps in one direction, and advanced broadband Internet as 200 kbps in both directions (uploading and downloading). There is not a single standard rate of transmission that has been set industry wide, however. Therefore the term broadband can mean much lower transmission speeds, depending on the ISP (Internet Service Provider). Some ISP’s take advantage of this, unfortunately, and promote slower transmission rates as broadband, unbeknownst to the customer oftentimes. In addition, because ISP’s often allow more customers to subscribe to their high-speed Internet service that they can usually handle, the bandwidth that they promote is rarely available.

Right now, there are three basic types of broadband Internet access available to the general public. The first one, known as DSL, is the standard broadband technology available. DSL (digital subscriber line) originated in 1988, when the Internet as a public entity was still in its infancy. It is still widely available today, mostly through telephone companies, as that is the technology that is required for DSL.

On the coattails of DSL in broadband Internet popularity is the cable modem. Cable modems provide comparable data transmission rates to DSL, though uploading data is usually a bit quicker still with DSL. However, the advantage of cable modems is that is does not tie up your home telephone line. Cable modems can also be used to provide telephone service (VOIP), and more cable companies are jumping on that bandwagon all the time. Often, though, cable modem service comes at a price. Cable companies are frequently hesitant to offer broadband Internet access without the customer subscribing to a certain level of cable television programming as well. For most people, this isn’t usually a big issue.

One major obstacle of broadband Internet access is that it is often difficult to provide the service to rural areas, due to technological constraints. The costs to connect outlying areas is high, therefore the technology is often slow to reach the regions outside of more densely populated urban areas. There is a solution, and technology has looked to the sky to provide yet another means of providing broadband Internet access to the masses.
Satellite Internet is a newer type of broadband Internet access, and is ideal for areas where land-based Internet access is not an option (such as on boats). It is more expensive, but is often the only way of getting Internet access of any kind in rural areas. The drawback of Satellite Internet is often the delay problem, due to the signal having to travel through space to the satellite and back to Earth again. This problem can be exacerbated because of any number of atmospheric conditions, from rain to sunspots. Fortunately, it really only affects those who participate in Internet gaming or use streaming video feeds. The delay is not really noticeable when using the Internet for email of other basic Internet services.

Broadband Internet access provides the computer user with a quicker way to enjoy the Internet. You don’t have to tie up your home phone line anymore to check your email, and you don’t have to be cut off from cyberspace if you have an incoming call. The speed of data transmission is vastly improved over dial-up Internet, which is a lot less frustrating when uploading or downloading large files. The best thing about broadband Internet access is that the cost for service is going down all the time, thanks to the competition of the various ISP’s. By doing research, you can find the right type of broadband Internet access to fit your individual needs.

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Wireless Internet Terminology – Confusion or Clarity

Wireless Internet Terminology, like many things in life, especially those that have anything to do with computers is filled with terminology. But like most things, once you learn a few of the basic terms, understanding will come quickly. So don’t be confused get informed and to help clarify, I’ve put together a basic wireless “internet-to-english” guide to help you along.

IEEE – The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
The IEEE is in charge of the wireless networking standard, as well as many other computer-related standards – including the Ethernet standard. They ensure that computer equipment made by different manufacturers can work together.

PCMCIA – Personal Computer Memory Card International Association
Simply another standard for how to plug credit card size devices into a laptop computer to boost it’s capabilities. It’s been suggested by some that it should stand for “People Can’t Memorize Computer Industry Acronyms”. PCMCIA is a great way of adding wireless networking to your laptop as easily as inserting a disk.

PCI – Peripheral Component Interconnect
Used to install devices like graphics cards and network devices inside your computer. You would be using a PCI, if you wanted to install a wireless card inside your computer.

802.11
Set by the IEEE, it’s the current wireless networking standard. It helps ensure that wireless devices can communicate with one another or in other words – they are interoperable.

Interoperable
Simply means that two different pieces of equipment have the ability to speak to each other or another way to put it – they are compatible. They can use them together because they were designed using the same standards. Because of the IEEE and the principle of interoperability, all wireless equipment you purchase should be compatible.

Driver
Not a piece of golf equipment but computer software that informs a computer how to talk to devices that plug into it. Most wireless networking drivers come on a CD-ROM. You then download the drivers from the CD onto your computer.

Ethernet
Currently, the most common way of connecting to a LAN or Local Area Network. Most wires connected to your computer today are ethernet and if you have a cable internet connection an ethernet wire is in all likely-hood, what is being used to connect to your modem.

USB – Universal Serial Bus
A port used for connecting all sorts of devices to a computer, including keyboards, a mouse, printers, external hard-drives and basically anything else you can think of. If you don’t have a laptop or want to open up your computer you can get a USB wireless device.

WEP – Wired Equivalent Privacy
No longer used because in 2001 it was found to have security issues. As a result, it is now the old standard for encrypting wireless networks.

WPA – WiFi Protected Access
The new standard for encrypting wireless networks. An upgrade of WEP to fix security issues. To avoid becoming vulnerable, a WPA encrypted network changes encryption methods often. In addition, if an attack is detected, it has the ability to shut itself down for thirty seconds.

PAN – Personal Area Network
A network of devices connected together in one small area. A simple example of a PAN would be your computer, USB keyboard and mouse. Using a technology called Bluetooth, a PAN can be wireless.

LAN – Local Area Network
Briefly mentioned above, LAN is a computer network that… generally speaking is confined to one building, such as a home or office. A wireless LAN is also known as a WLAN.

MAN – Metropolitan Area Network
A network that covers a larger area, like a city or town. They are expensive but a wireless MAN has the capacity to spread Internet access across a wide area. Many college universities set-up a MAN to connect the entire campus.

WAN – Wide Area Network
A network that covers or connects to more than one physical site. A simple example would be a business that has locations in different cities, states or countries and they need them each location connected on the same network. The Internet itself is a WAN… the biggest WAN in the world.

Mbps – Megabits Per Second
Not to be confused with MBps, megabytes per second. Mbps is measurement of connection speed. There are eight megabits in a megabyte.

GHz – Gigahertz
One gigahertz is one billion cycles per second… it’s a measurement of frequency. If the term sounds familiar it’s probably because it’s also used to measure the processing speed of the CPU on your computer, which is also measured in gigahertz.

Linux
A popular and growing alternative operating system to Windows. Linux is a less bulky, more efficient operating system in many ways than Windows and not to mention – it’s free. Many servers run Linux for this reason. Computers running Linux can run many programs and connect to the Internet without needing Windows. Many wireless devices run Linux or are compatible with it.

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The Merits Of Switching To Fixed Line NBN

Are you looking to switch to fixed line NBN Internet plans in Australia but unsure as to whether it is right for you? What are some of the things that you need to know about the particular NBN technology? These are valid questions especially if you are new to the whole NBN bandwagon.

The NBN or the National Broadband Network is an across the country task introduced by the Federal Government of Australia to provide high-speed Internet connection to everyone in the country. Wherever you remain in the state, there is a particular NBN connection that suits you.

Among the options for NBN plans is the NBN fixed line As its name indicates, this connection travels through a set range of fibre optic cables. These cables are presently being released throughout Australia for locations that will have fixed line connections.  Unfortunately, this means that the service is currently unavailable to people that live in rural areas of the country. If that sounds like you, then there is the option to opt for wireless NBN which is a bit slower but still more reliable than conventional ADSL broadband.

The best ways to get NBN fixed line.

When the fibre optic cables in your area have been positioned, and your home is ready, you can quickly change from your ADSL or ADSL2+ broadband connection to NBN fixed line.You contact your service provider for support. Most NBN Web companies would not charge anything to you for making the switch.

What are the benefits NBN fixed line?

The NBN fixed line technology is the most advanced in the whole network. This specific connection will yield network speeds of as much as 100 mbps and upload speeds of approximately 40 mbps. Naturally, there are slightly slower connections any family might avail depending on their strategy.

Here are some advantages of the NBN fixed line:

  • Transmits information over far away without losing connection speed

  • Not impacted by noise and other ground activity resulting in stable connectivity

  • Can support high bandwidth which implies several parties can link without losing speed

Are you convinced that fixed line NBN is the right type of web service for you? If so, then you might want to check with the available ISPs in your area that can help you sign up for a fixed line NBN Internet Service to see if your location qualifies and benefit from the benefits mentioned above.

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